Housing

    Results: 8

  • Community Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.8500-150

    Community Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-150

    Programs, usually sponsored by community organizations or coalitions, that provide temporary shelter for homeless people, generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy. Most community shelters offer support services which may include counseling, advocacy, referrals and help with future plans; and enforce house rules including curfews and mandatory household chores. Participation in religious activities is either optional or not a part of the program. There may be differences in intake, length of stay and amenities in family oriented facilities and those that target other specific populations.
  • Housing Search Assistance (1)
    BH-3900.3100

    Housing Search Assistance

    BH-3900.3100

    Programs that assign a staff member to assist people who are looking for housing to survey the available residences and to choose and obtain the most suitable option.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing (1)
    BH-7000.4600

    Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600

    Housing programs that make rental housing more readily available to homeless people and/or low-income individuals and families (those below 50% of the area's median income). Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.
  • Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.6000

    Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.6000

    Residential facilities for older adults and/or people with disabilities who are unable to function in an independent living environment because they need assistance with toileting, bathing, dressing, medication management and administration, meals and housekeeping and other activities of daily living, but do not require nursing care on a regular basis. Living options range from state institutions for individuals with the most severe disabilities who require intensive services to settings that enable individuals with disabilities to live with their own families or in their own homes or apartments with supportive services from community-based supported living providers. Alternatives in between include health care facilities for people with a primary need for developmental services in combination with an intermittent need for skilled nursing care; community care facilities (residential care homes or group homes) for people who require varying levels of supervision and assistance in the activities of daily living; assisted living facilities; continuing care retirement communities; life care communities; foster family placements for adults who will benefit from interaction in a family environment; and semi-independent living facilities for individuals with disabilities who need minimal levels of support to live and work in the community. Some of these facilities are licensed by the state.
  • Public Housing (2)
    BH-7000.4600-600

    Public Housing

    BH-7000.4600-600

    Housing developments or scattered single family dwellings that are owned and managed by local housing authorities and rented to income and program eligible individuals and families, including older adults and people with disabilities. The units are governed by federal regulations which determine the application process, eligibility requirements, and tenant payment and lease obligations. Eligible households pay approximately 30% of their adjusted gross income for rent.
  • Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-800

    Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-800

    Programs that provide housing in a group setting for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities or multiple disabilities in facilities like small homes, apartment buildings, condominiums or agency-owned complexes which may be staffed to provide functional skills training and on-site supportive services. Residents generally have basic self-help skills or take responsibility for employing and supervising aides to assist them in meeting their personal needs. Staff may be available on a 24-hour basis or only occasionally depending on the specific needs of residents. Included are short-term transitional programs for people who are preparing for supported or totally independent living as well as long-term programs for people who may want to be permanent residents.
  • Therapeutic Foster Homes (1)
    PH-6300.8500

    Therapeutic Foster Homes

    PH-6300.8500

    Agency-supervised private family homes in which foster parents have been trained to provide individualized, structured services in a safe, nurturing family living environment for children and adolescents with significant emotional or behavioral problems who require a higher level of care than is found in a conventional foster home but do not require placement in a more restrictive setting. Therapeutic foster parents receive special training in mental health issues, behavior management and parenting techniques; and implement the in-home portion of the treatment plan with close supervision and support. They serve as integral members of the team of professionals providing services for the child, get the child to therapy and other treatment appointments, write daily notes about interventions and attend treatment team meetings. Therapeutic foster care is considered the least restrictive out-of-home placement for children with severe emotional disorders.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (4)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
 
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